Saturday, 23 February 2013

" ...A Town Without Poverty? Dauphin, Manitoba, Canada's only experiment in guaranteed income..."

" ...A Town Without Poverty? Dauphin, Manitoba, Canada's only experiment in guaranteed income "Minicome" finally gets reckoning by Vivian Belik  (Audio & Text URLS)... For a four-year period in the 1970s, the poorest families in Dauphin, Manitoba, were granted a guaranteed minimum income by the federal and provincial governments. Thirty-five years later all that remains of the experiment are 2,000 boxes of documents..." Text http://www.dominionpaper.ca/articles/4100 CBC Radio "Superior Morning" Audio file via YouTube http://youtu.be/pQ1CapAOu7M

Friday, 22 February 2013

Norwegian Government last week decided to establish a new, large university in Norway, the University of Troms

Norway gets Arctic University - University of Troms and Finnmark University College will be merged to form University of Troms – Norway's Arctic University.The Norwegian Government last week decided to establish a new, large university in Norway, the University of Troms - Norway's Arctic University. More information here
RT @northern_clips: Norway gets #Arctic #University - the University of Troms http://ow.ly/hWE3v

Thursday, 21 February 2013

#NWT #MLA Members Statement on POLICY FRAMEWORK FOR #GNWT-SPONSORED #SOCIALMEDIA SITES


MEMBER'S STATEMENT ON

POLICY FRAMEWORK FOR GNWT-SPONSORED SOCIAL MEDIA SITES

HANSARD
UNEDITED TRANSCRIPT TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2013 YELLOWKNIFE, NORTHWEST TERRITORIES

http://www.assembly.gov.nt.ca/_live/documents/content/hn130219.pdf

MS. BISARO: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. With the advent, acceptance and increasing use of social media worldwide, governments are becoming involved using Facebook, Twitter, You Tube and other social media sites to promote information sharing and to communicate with residents.

Our government has also joined the social media trend. GNWT websites and government Facebook pages are popping up in more and more places. This is encouraging, but have we as a government ensured that there are consistent guidelines and policies for GNWT sponsored social media. It doesn't seem that way. It's another case of us joining the crowd, moving too fast and not considering the effect and the implications of our actions.

Let me give you an example. Recently I discovered a GNWT sponsored and developed Facebook page with a number of likes on the page. For those of you Facebook luddites, a like indicates support for the person, business or organization. A like on a Facebook page is prominently displayed and can influence readers to support the person or the organization or to use the business. It can also be a selling tool. I've found private businesses liked on more than one GNWT sponsored Facebook page. This is inappropriate, Mr. Speaker.

A government must not only be impartial, but must be seen to be objective and impartial. As a government, we should not be showing favouritism to any one business over another. Additionally, there's the issue of responding to and making comments within the social media sites. Any comments posted on a GNWT Facebook page or webpage reflect the government's view. Are the administrators of these pages given any guidelines on how to respond to comments, post comments and so on.

There seems to be a gap in policy development here. Facebook pages are initiated throughout the government and by many different departments, but do we as a government have any policies or guidelines to assist those people in their development of webpages and Facebook pages. It appears not. We often use contractors to do things like develop Facebook pages and websites. Do they have any policies or guidelines to follow? It appears not.

We have a chief information officer and we have an information policy gap needing to be fixed. This is a job for his office. Thank you.

MR. SPEAKER: Thank you, Ms. Bisaro.

QUESTION 91-17(4):
POLICY FRAMEWORK FOR GNWT-SPONSORED SOCIAL MEDIA SITES

MS. BISARO: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. My questions today are addressed to the Minister of Finance. I would like to follow up on my statement and ask him questions about whether or not we have policies in regards to our use of social media. I know we have some policies that apply to individual employees. For instance, Facebook is blocked on employees' computers. Cell phone use, I know, is listed. There is a policy on cell phone use. I'd like to know from the Minister, in terms of the development of Facebook sites and websites and in terms of the maintenance of Facebook sites and websites, do we have any policies or any guidelines that people follow?

MR. SPEAKER: Thank you, Ms. Bisaro. The honourable Minister of Finance, Mr. Miltenberger.

HON. MICHAEL MILTENBERGER: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Apparently none that I'm aware of.

MS. BISARO: I didn't hear the answer. Thank you very much, colleagues. To the Minister, I would like to know whether or not this is something that as a government, I feel that we need to remain impartial and I would like to know from the Minister whether or not he thinks there's a policy gap here and, if so, is he willing to do something about developing some guidelines and some policies to handle Facebook sites and websites?

HON. MICHAEL MILTENBERGER: I'll commit to review the matter with the appropriate officials in the departments and if there is deemed to be a policy gap then we'll, of course, take the steps to close that gap.

MS. BISARO: Thanks to the Minister for that commitment. I appreciate that. In the absence of anything right now, if we have Facebook sites which have likes on them, a particular business that has been liked which indicates that the GNWT likes this business and not another one, for instance, what is the Minister going to do to try and monitor Facebook sites and website that we have that may have particular preferences for a business or organization?

HON. MICHAEL MILTENBERGER: I'll commit to put this matter on the table for Cabinet strategy tomorrow, and where all the senior officials are, as well, and we'll discuss the best way to make sure that we are impartial in all the appropriate areas as it pertains to government policy.

MS. BISARO: I appreciate the commitment from the Minister. I guess I would just like to say I appreciate this is coming before senior management and Cabinet. I'd like to suggest to the Minister that we don't have to reinvent the wheel. There are lots of governments out there that, no doubt, have policies and guidelines, so I would suggest to the Minister that we copy them more than develop our own.

MR. SPEAKER: Thank you, Ms. Bisaro. No question there. Mr. Miltenberger.
HON. MICHAEL MILTENBERGER: Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I appreciate the

Member's sage advice and I will keep that in mind as we move forward.

MR. SPEAKER: Thank you, Mr. Miltenberger.

Tuesday, 19 February 2013

UN Special Rapporteur on the right to food - WHERE: Northern United Place, Yellowknife via teleconference

UN Special Rapporteur on the right to food -
WHEN: March 4th 10-11:30am
WHERE: Northern United Place
WHAT: A conversation with Olivier De Schutter, the UN Special Rapporteur on the right to food. By teleconference from Geneva, the UN Special Rapporteur will present the main results of the report of his mission to Canada  and participate in discussion with key Canadian stakeholders. This is a session of the first NWT Food Network Gathering that will be open to the public.
This will be an opportunity to hear more and ask questions on the topics addressed in the preliminary report such as poverty, growing inequity, health, obesity, sustainable agriculture and food systems, and the rights of First Nations, Northern and remote communities to healthy and affordable food.
For more information: http://foodsecurecanada.org/un-right-food-mission-coming-canada

--
GEORGE LESSARD
Information, Communications and Media Specialist
Sp├ęcialiste en l'information, communications et  media
451 Norseman Dr.
Yellowknife, Northwest Territories
X1A 2J1, Canada
E-mail: mediamentorATgmailDOTcom
iPhone FaceTime/text cell: 867 445-9193
Skype: themediamentor 
10

Friday, 15 February 2013

Yukon Minister says slow and expensive Internet is hurting economic growth

Minister says slow and expensive Internet is hurting economic growth
CBC News
Posted: Feb 15, 2013 10:35 AM CST
Last Updated: Feb 15, 2013 12:04 PM CST
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/story/2013/02/14/north-yukon-internet-directorate.html
[excerpt] "...The Yukon Government is promising to do something about slow
and expensive internet and telecommunications services in the territory.

Economic Development Minister Currie Dixon made the surprise announcement
at a Chamber of Commerce luncheon Thursday in Whitehorse.

Dixon told the crowd a recent report to the government confirmed what most
Yukoners already know. Compared to southern Canada, download speeds are
much slower and consumers pay double for half the service....."

Thursday, 14 February 2013

Computer Programs now available for donation to Canadian nonprofit organizations

Adobe, Symantec and 16 other donor partners open eligibility to nonprofits

http://www.techsoupcanada.ca/community/blog/nonprofit-eligibility-expansion

At TechSoup Canada, http://www.techsoupcanada.ca we believe that nonprofit organizations in Canada (registered charities or not) are changing the world every day. Making access to donated software available to the nonprofit sector as a whole has been a goal of ours since our launch in 2009.

We're excited to announce that we've now expanded the eligibility requirements for many of our programs that were previously unavailable to nonprofit organizations.


Programs now available for donation to nonprofit organizations are:


These donors join Microsoft, Intuit, Sumac, Sage and GrantStation which have already been available to nonprofit organizations.

Please note that eligibility requirements are different for each of our donor partners, so while the expansion has now opened up eligibility to the nonprofit sector, your organization may or may not qualify for specific programs based on the criteria set out by our donors. To find out more about your eligibility for our donation programs, please visit http://www.techsoupcanada.ca/eligibility

--
GEORGE LESSARD
10
10

Sunday, 10 February 2013

George Lessard's QR Code

Via Flickr:
A QR code listing my contact information and URLs

Friday, 8 February 2013

Qiniq announces higher-speed internet across Nunavut

Qiniq announces higher-speed internet across Nunavut
SSI responds to Northwestel's broadband gambit
http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/stories/article/65674qiniq_announces_higher-speed_internet_across_nunavut/
[excerpt] ".... The Qiniq internet service in Nunavut, operated by the SSI
Group, announced the addition of two new higher-speed internet plans Feb.
7.
http://www.qiniq.com/broadband-pricing
The two new packages, branded as "Atii Plus" and "Atii Pro," are offered
within all 25 communities in Nunavut and "not just the three largest
centers targeted by our competitor's new DSL plans," a Qiniq news release
said.
The Atii Pro plan, which costs $369.95 a month for Nunavut residents,
offers download speeds that burst up to 2.5 Mbps, with a 30 GB usage cap.
The Atii Plus plan, which costs $129.95 a month, offers download speeds
that burst up to 2 Mbps, with a 15 GB monthly cap. ...."

Qiniq announces higher-speed internet across Nunavut

Qiniq announces higher-speed internet across Nunavut
SSI responds to Northwestel's broadband gambit
http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/stories/article/65674qiniq_announces_higher-speed_internet_across_nunavut/
[excerpt] ".... The Qiniq internet service in Nunavut, operated by the SSI
Group, announced the addition of two new higher-speed internet plans Feb.
7.
http://www.qiniq.com/broadband-pricing
The two new packages, branded as "Atii Plus" and "Atii Pro," are offered
within all 25 communities in Nunavut and "not just the three largest
centers targeted by our competitor's new DSL plans," a Qiniq news release
said.
The Atii Pro plan, which costs $369.95 a month for Nunavut residents,
offers download speeds that burst up to 2.5 Mbps, with a 30 GB usage cap.
The Atii Plus plan, which costs $129.95 a month, offers download speeds
that burst up to 2 Mbps, with a 15 GB monthly cap. ...."

Wednesday, 6 February 2013

Feds don't monitor northern mines closely enough, says Canada's environmental watchdog

Feds don't monitor northern mines closely enough, says Canada's environmental watchdog http://t.co/PoEGz3l0 via @cbcnorth
[excerpt]

The Commissioner of the Environment and Sustainable Development, Scott Vaughan, found major shortfalls in the way the department monitors financial accountability and inspects mines.

The Commissioner found that Aboriginal Affairs does not regularly assess whether companies are putting aside enough money during the life of a mine to cover the cost of a clean-up.

For example, three of the 11 mines in Nunavut had shortfalls in the amounts needed to meet the terms and conditions of their licenses.

The report also says Aboriginal Affairs is not completing 70 per cent of required site inspections of resource development projects in the Northwest Territories.

After devolution, which will give the N.W.T. more province-like powers, the responsibility for inspecting mines will fall to the territorial government.


Saturday, 2 February 2013

Re: [ArtsNet] The Arts and Individual Well-Being in Canada

This is excellent information for the grant-writer. When the criteria asks, "How is your project going to impact others?" you now have the answers below.

On Sat, Feb 2, 2013 at 2:48 PM, George Lessard <mediamentor@gmail.com> wrote:
 

The Arts and Individual Well-Being in Canada

Connections between Cultural Activities and Health, Volunteering, Satisfaction with Life, and Other Social Indicators in 2010

http://www.hillstrategies.com/content/arts-and-individual-well-being-canada

[excerpts]

Executive Summary

The Arts and Individual Well-Being in Canada, the 39th report in the Statistical Insights on the Arts series, examines whether connections exist between Canadians' cultural activities and their personal well-being.

The data in the report show that there is a strong connection between 18 cultural activities and eight indicators of health and well-being (such as health, mental health, volunteering, feeling stressed, and overall satisfaction with life). Cultural participants have significantly better results than non-participants for 101 out of 144 cross-tabulations (or 70%). Cultural participants have significantly worse results for only 10 of the cross-tabulations (or 7%). (Further details about the eight social indicators and 18 cultural activities are provided at the end of this summary.)

Six cultural activities and three social indicators were selected for detailed statistical modeling. The key findings of the statistical models are that:

  • Art gallery visits are associated with better health and higher volunteer rates.
  • Theatre attendance is associated with better health, volunteering, and strong satisfaction with life.
  • Classical music attendance is associated with higher volunteer rates and strong satisfaction with life.
  • Pop music attendance is associated with better health, volunteering, and strong satisfaction with life.
  • Attendance at cultural festivals is associated with better health, volunteering, and strong satisfaction with life.
  • Reading books is associated with better health, volunteering, and strong satisfaction with life.

The statistical models explore whether participation in these arts and culture activities have an association with social indicators above and beyond demographic information. That is, they examine whether cultural participants simply fit the demographic profile of healthy, socially-active citizens, or whether cultural participation might help explain aspects of health and well-being that are beyond demographic analysis.

While the statistical models provide evidence of a connection between cultural activities and well-being, some questions about variables that might have an association with the three indicators of well-being (such as the influence of smoking or alcohol consumption on health) were not available in the General Social Survey. In addition, it is very difficult to provide evidence of a cause and effect relationship between the variables in a statistical model in the absence of an experiment to directly measure the impacts of culture on personal well-being.

Specific findings for each of the six cultural activities

Art gallery attendance

The exploratory data analysis shows that art gallery attendance has a statistically significant connection with six of the eight social indicators. Compared with those who did not visit an art gallery in 2010, art gallery visitors:

  • Are much more likely to report that they have very good or excellent health (60% vs. 47%).
  • Are much more likely to report that they have very good or excellent mental health (67% vs. 58%).
  • Are much more likely to volunteer (50% vs. 31%).
  • Are less likely to feel trapped in a daily routine (30% vs. 37%).
  • Are more likely to have done a favour for a neighbour in the past month (69% vs. 63%).
  • Are slightly more likely to report very strong satisfaction with life (62% vs. 58%).

In a statistical model of health, art gallery visitors have a 35% greater likelihood of reporting very good or excellent health than non-visitors, even accounting for other factors. Art gallery visitors have an 89% greater likelihood of having volunteered in the past year than non-visitors, even after controlling for other factors. In a model of satisfaction with life, art gallery visitors were not shown to have a significantly greater likelihood of reporting very strong satisfaction with life than non-visitors, once other factors were accounted for in the model.

Theatre attendance

Theatre attendance has a statistically significant connection with seven of the eight social indicators. Compared with those who did not attend a play in 2010, theatre attendees:

  • Are much more likely to report that they have very good or excellent health (58% vs. 46%).
  • Are much more likely to report that they have very good or excellent mental health (67% vs. 57%).
  • Are much more likely to volunteer (50% vs. 28%).
  • Are less likely to feel trapped in a daily routine (30% vs. 38%).
  • Are more likely to know many or most of their neighbours (46% vs. 41%).
  • Are more likely to have done a favour for a neighbour in the past month (70% vs. 61%).
  • Are more likely to report very strong satisfaction with life (64% vs. 56%).

In a statistical model of health, theatre goers have a 32% greater likelihood of reporting very good or excellent health than non-attendees, even after controlling for other factors. Theatre attendees are 2.29 times more likely than non-attendees to have volunteered in the past year, even accounting for other factors. In a model of satisfaction with life, theatre attendees have a 30% greater likelihood of reporting very strong satisfaction with life than non-attendees, once other factors were accounted for in the model.

Classical music attendance

Classical music attendance has a statistically significant connection with six of the eight social indicators. Compared with those who did not attend a classical concert in 2010, those who did attend:

  • Are more likely to report that they have very good or excellent health (58% vs. 51%).
  • Are more likely to report that they have very good or excellent mental health (67% vs. 61%).
  • Are much more likely to volunteer (55% vs. 35%).
  • Are much less likely to feel trapped in a daily routine (26% vs. 36%).
  • Are more likely to have done a favour for a neighbour in the past month (71% vs. 64%).
  • Are more likely to report very strong satisfaction with life (68% vs. 59%).

In a statistical model of volunteering, classical music attendees have an 86% greater likelihood of having volunteered in the past year than non-attendees, even after controlling for other factors. Classical music attendees are 29% more likely to report very strong satisfaction with life than non-attendees, even accounting for other factors. In the health model, classical music attendees were not shown to have a significantly greater likelihood of reporting very good or excellent health than non-attendees, once demographic factors were accounted for in the model.

Popular music attendance

Pop music attendance has a statistically significant connection with seven of the eight social indicators. Compared with those who did not attend a pop concert in 2010, those who did attend:

  • Are much more likely to report that they have very good or excellent health (58% vs. 48%).
  • Are more likely to report that they have very good or excellent mental health (66% vs. 59%).
  • Are much more likely to volunteer (47% vs. 32%).
  • Are less likely to feel trapped in a daily routine (31% vs. 36%).
  • Are somewhat more likely to have done a favour for a neighbour in the past month (69% vs. 63%).
  • Are slightly more likely to report very strong satisfaction with life (62% vs. 58%).

On the other hand, pop concert attendees are less likely than non-attendees to feel low levels of stress in their daily lives (35% vs. 40% feel not at all or not very stressed).

In a statistical model of health, pop concert attendees have a 23% greater likelihood of reporting very good or excellent health than non-attendees, even after controlling for other factors. Pop music attendees are 64% more likely than non-attendees to have volunteered in the past year, even accounting for other factors. In a model of satisfaction with life, popular music attendees have an 18% greater likelihood of reporting very strong satisfaction with life than non-attendees, once other factors were accounted for in the model.

Attendance at cultural festivals

Cultural festival attendance has a statistically significant connection with five of the eight social indicators. Compared with those who did not attend a cultural festival in 2010, those who did attend:

  • Are more likely to report that they have very good or excellent health (56% vs. 49%).
  • Are somewhat more likely to report that they have very good or excellent mental health (64% vs. 60%).
  • Are much more likely to volunteer (48% vs. 32%).
  • Are more likely to have done a favour for a neighbour in the past month (70% vs. 62%).

On the other hand, cultural festival attendees are slightly less likely than non-attendees to feel low levels of stress in their daily lives (35% vs. 40% feel not at all or not very stressed).

In a statistical model of health, cultural festival attendees have a 14% greater likelihood of reporting very good or excellent health than non-attendees, even after controlling for other factors. Festival attendees are twice as likely as non-attendees to have volunteered in the past year, even accounting for other factors. In a model of satisfaction with life, cultural festival attendees have a 25% greater likelihood of reporting very strong satisfaction with life than non-attendees, once other factors were accounted for in the model. [...]

Download the full report
Arts_well_being2010.pdf587.57 KB
http://www.hillstrategies.com/sites/default/files/Arts_well_being2010.pdf

Related documentation
Executive Summary (7 pages)266.22 KB
http://www.hillstrategies.com/sites/default/files/Arts_well_being2010_ExecSumm_0.pdf
Technical Supplement410.15 KB
http://www.hillstrategies.com/sites/default/files/Arts_well_being2010_Technical_Supplement.pdf
Media release
http://www.hillstrategies.com/sites/default/files/Arts_well_being2010_media.pdf




Media release

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Celia McBride
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celiamcbride.com
laststopformiles.com
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H 867.456.7830

The Arts and Individual Well-Being in Canada

The Arts and Individual Well-Being in Canada

Connections between Cultural Activities and Health, Volunteering, Satisfaction with Life, and Other Social Indicators in 2010

http://www.hillstrategies.com/content/arts-and-individual-well-being-canada

[excerpts]

Executive Summary

The Arts and Individual Well-Being in Canada, the 39th report in the Statistical Insights on the Arts series, examines whether connections exist between Canadians' cultural activities and their personal well-being.

The data in the report show that there is a strong connection between 18 cultural activities and eight indicators of health and well-being (such as health, mental health, volunteering, feeling stressed, and overall satisfaction with life). Cultural participants have significantly better results than non-participants for 101 out of 144 cross-tabulations (or 70%). Cultural participants have significantly worse results for only 10 of the cross-tabulations (or 7%). (Further details about the eight social indicators and 18 cultural activities are provided at the end of this summary.)

Six cultural activities and three social indicators were selected for detailed statistical modeling. The key findings of the statistical models are that:

  • Art gallery visits are associated with better health and higher volunteer rates.
  • Theatre attendance is associated with better health, volunteering, and strong satisfaction with life.
  • Classical music attendance is associated with higher volunteer rates and strong satisfaction with life.
  • Pop music attendance is associated with better health, volunteering, and strong satisfaction with life.
  • Attendance at cultural festivals is associated with better health, volunteering, and strong satisfaction with life.
  • Reading books is associated with better health, volunteering, and strong satisfaction with life.

The statistical models explore whether participation in these arts and culture activities have an association with social indicators above and beyond demographic information. That is, they examine whether cultural participants simply fit the demographic profile of healthy, socially-active citizens, or whether cultural participation might help explain aspects of health and well-being that are beyond demographic analysis.

While the statistical models provide evidence of a connection between cultural activities and well-being, some questions about variables that might have an association with the three indicators of well-being (such as the influence of smoking or alcohol consumption on health) were not available in the General Social Survey. In addition, it is very difficult to provide evidence of a cause and effect relationship between the variables in a statistical model in the absence of an experiment to directly measure the impacts of culture on personal well-being.

Specific findings for each of the six cultural activities

Art gallery attendance

The exploratory data analysis shows that art gallery attendance has a statistically significant connection with six of the eight social indicators. Compared with those who did not visit an art gallery in 2010, art gallery visitors:

  • Are much more likely to report that they have very good or excellent health (60% vs. 47%).
  • Are much more likely to report that they have very good or excellent mental health (67% vs. 58%).
  • Are much more likely to volunteer (50% vs. 31%).
  • Are less likely to feel trapped in a daily routine (30% vs. 37%).
  • Are more likely to have done a favour for a neighbour in the past month (69% vs. 63%).
  • Are slightly more likely to report very strong satisfaction with life (62% vs. 58%).

In a statistical model of health, art gallery visitors have a 35% greater likelihood of reporting very good or excellent health than non-visitors, even accounting for other factors. Art gallery visitors have an 89% greater likelihood of having volunteered in the past year than non-visitors, even after controlling for other factors. In a model of satisfaction with life, art gallery visitors were not shown to have a significantly greater likelihood of reporting very strong satisfaction with life than non-visitors, once other factors were accounted for in the model.

Theatre attendance

Theatre attendance has a statistically significant connection with seven of the eight social indicators. Compared with those who did not attend a play in 2010, theatre attendees:

  • Are much more likely to report that they have very good or excellent health (58% vs. 46%).
  • Are much more likely to report that they have very good or excellent mental health (67% vs. 57%).
  • Are much more likely to volunteer (50% vs. 28%).
  • Are less likely to feel trapped in a daily routine (30% vs. 38%).
  • Are more likely to know many or most of their neighbours (46% vs. 41%).
  • Are more likely to have done a favour for a neighbour in the past month (70% vs. 61%).
  • Are more likely to report very strong satisfaction with life (64% vs. 56%).

In a statistical model of health, theatre goers have a 32% greater likelihood of reporting very good or excellent health than non-attendees, even after controlling for other factors. Theatre attendees are 2.29 times more likely than non-attendees to have volunteered in the past year, even accounting for other factors. In a model of satisfaction with life, theatre attendees have a 30% greater likelihood of reporting very strong satisfaction with life than non-attendees, once other factors were accounted for in the model.

Classical music attendance

Classical music attendance has a statistically significant connection with six of the eight social indicators. Compared with those who did not attend a classical concert in 2010, those who did attend:

  • Are more likely to report that they have very good or excellent health (58% vs. 51%).
  • Are more likely to report that they have very good or excellent mental health (67% vs. 61%).
  • Are much more likely to volunteer (55% vs. 35%).
  • Are much less likely to feel trapped in a daily routine (26% vs. 36%).
  • Are more likely to have done a favour for a neighbour in the past month (71% vs. 64%).
  • Are more likely to report very strong satisfaction with life (68% vs. 59%).

In a statistical model of volunteering, classical music attendees have an 86% greater likelihood of having volunteered in the past year than non-attendees, even after controlling for other factors. Classical music attendees are 29% more likely to report very strong satisfaction with life than non-attendees, even accounting for other factors. In the health model, classical music attendees were not shown to have a significantly greater likelihood of reporting very good or excellent health than non-attendees, once demographic factors were accounted for in the model.

Popular music attendance

Pop music attendance has a statistically significant connection with seven of the eight social indicators. Compared with those who did not attend a pop concert in 2010, those who did attend:

  • Are much more likely to report that they have very good or excellent health (58% vs. 48%).
  • Are more likely to report that they have very good or excellent mental health (66% vs. 59%).
  • Are much more likely to volunteer (47% vs. 32%).
  • Are less likely to feel trapped in a daily routine (31% vs. 36%).
  • Are somewhat more likely to have done a favour for a neighbour in the past month (69% vs. 63%).
  • Are slightly more likely to report very strong satisfaction with life (62% vs. 58%).

On the other hand, pop concert attendees are less likely than non-attendees to feel low levels of stress in their daily lives (35% vs. 40% feel not at all or not very stressed).

In a statistical model of health, pop concert attendees have a 23% greater likelihood of reporting very good or excellent health than non-attendees, even after controlling for other factors. Pop music attendees are 64% more likely than non-attendees to have volunteered in the past year, even accounting for other factors. In a model of satisfaction with life, popular music attendees have an 18% greater likelihood of reporting very strong satisfaction with life than non-attendees, once other factors were accounted for in the model.

Attendance at cultural festivals

Cultural festival attendance has a statistically significant connection with five of the eight social indicators. Compared with those who did not attend a cultural festival in 2010, those who did attend:

  • Are more likely to report that they have very good or excellent health (56% vs. 49%).
  • Are somewhat more likely to report that they have very good or excellent mental health (64% vs. 60%).
  • Are much more likely to volunteer (48% vs. 32%).
  • Are more likely to have done a favour for a neighbour in the past month (70% vs. 62%).

On the other hand, cultural festival attendees are slightly less likely than non-attendees to feel low levels of stress in their daily lives (35% vs. 40% feel not at all or not very stressed).

In a statistical model of health, cultural festival attendees have a 14% greater likelihood of reporting very good or excellent health than non-attendees, even after controlling for other factors. Festival attendees are twice as likely as non-attendees to have volunteered in the past year, even accounting for other factors. In a model of satisfaction with life, cultural festival attendees have a 25% greater likelihood of reporting very strong satisfaction with life than non-attendees, once other factors were accounted for in the model. [...]

Download the full report
Arts_well_being2010.pdf587.57 KB
http://www.hillstrategies.com/sites/default/files/Arts_well_being2010.pdf

Related documentation
Executive Summary (7 pages)266.22 KB
http://www.hillstrategies.com/sites/default/files/Arts_well_being2010_ExecSumm_0.pdf
Technical Supplement410.15 KB
http://www.hillstrategies.com/sites/default/files/Arts_well_being2010_Technical_Supplement.pdf
Media release
http://www.hillstrategies.com/sites/default/files/Arts_well_being2010_media.pdf




Media release

Friday, 1 February 2013

Yellowknives Dene & UBC Prof Glen Coulthard : Idle? Know More! Idle No More YouTube video

"..Dr. Glen Coulthard is a member of the Yellowknives Dene and a scholar of contemporary Indigenous politics. He is an Assistant Professor in First Nations Studies and the Department of Political Science at UBC. He is a founding member of the Camas Books & Infoshop in Victoria and the Dechinta Center for Research and Learning in Yellowknives Dene territory. From the Idle? Know More! Event held on January 22nd 2013 in Vancouver, Unceded Coast Salish Territories..." http://youtu.be/L_QruWLRDmc